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Forgotten landmarks of New York

Events, time, and people seem to have forgotten them. They are around New York, perhaps wishing to get there glory back: they are they forgotten landmarks that once adorned New York. If they could talk, and write, they surely could be best sellers. In a bid to remind New Yorkers on this impressive, but forgotten Landmarks, Kevin Walsh embarked on a journey around New York snapping almost anything that appeared impressive. Here are some forgotten landmarks that he managed to unearth.

Little Red Lighthouse

The little Red lighthouse is found in Fort Washington Park, Manhattan. It has stood here since 1921, although it was originally built in 1889. It is next to the George Washington Bridge built in 1931. After the construction of the bridge, there were plans to remove it, but these plans were shelved when it became an adored landmark when it was used in Hildegarde Swift children book the little Red Lighthouse in 1942.

Morris-Jumel Mansion

This mansion is found in Edgecombe Avenue, 162nd street, Manhattan. This residence holds the record of being the oldest private residence in Manhattan. Its history dates back to 1765 when it was constructed by the British colonel Roger Morris. The house was later to be temporarily housed by George Washington during the revolutionary war during the battle of Harlem heights. A French businessman Stephen Jumel later bought the house.

Stuyvesant Street

This street is found in East Village, Manhattan. Other than the Broadway Street, this is the only street breaking the grid pattern between Broadway, and the St. Marks place. The street is famous for being the driveway to the Stuyvesant family farm. Along the street can be found historic building such as St. Mark’s church constructed in 1799 and the Stuyvesant Fish house constructed at around 1804.

City Island

This island small Island approximately 2.4 kilometers long is located in Bronx. This Island is popularly known for its seafood restaurants. It is also home to the city Island Nautical museum. Some of the earliest inhabitants of the Island were the Lenape, and Siwanoy Indians. Much of the Island history is chronicled in the book Tales of clamdiggers written by Alice Payne.

Cable-Stayed Bridges

This bridge is found in Manhattan. Although New York boosts thousands of Bridges, this Bridge is one of the most outstanding, and seems to have resisted the charm associated with the cable-stated bridges. Two mini version of the bridge are found on the East and west sides.

The Prospects cemetery

The prospects cemetery in Jamaica, Queens is one of the oldest cemeteries in New York that was established by Dutch settlers in 1668. There burial ground, together with its chapel lay in ruins until one of the descendants of one of the burial ground residents helped in the restoration of the cemetery.

Little Brazil

The little Brazil is found in the 46th street between the fifth and sixth avenues in Manhattan. For a city that renews itself often, it is rather surprising to find a street that has remained unchanged for such a long time. The little Brazil has many Brazilian themed restaurants including an ancient townhouse.

World’s Fair Mosaics

This Mosaic is found in Flushing Meadow, Corona Park, Queens. Only two world fairs flushing meadows have been held at the Flushing Meadows: in the years 1939/1949 and 1964/1965. Many structures dating back to the events are present in the park some still in use, and some ruining.

 

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